An interview with Andrew Shea on Designing for Social Change

Identified as a “place to start” by renowned designer and social entrepreneur, William Drenttel, Designing for Social Change by Andrew Shea, is an insightful guidebook and designer’s co-pilot containing a compilation of case studies that illustrate project concepts, funding resources, processes, strategies, and outcomes. It is a go-to resource for any designer interested or engaged in community-based work. A first-of-its-kind, Designing for Social Change is marked by ten strategies, an...

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An Interview with Noah Scalin and Michelle Taute on The Design Activist’s Handbook

As part of a DROB series of interviews with authors, Jenny Venn interviews Noah Scalin and Michelle Taute about co-authoring the useful and inspiring book The Design Activists Handbook and about the emerging niche of designing for social change.     Jenny Venn: Noah, you’ve worked with a variety of social change clients/projects over the years. What separates social change projects/clients from more traditional projects/clients you’ve worked for in the past?  Noah Scalin: I...

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I Am My Family

Review by Andrew Shea We all want to know what our ancestors were like 50, 100 or even 200 years ago. Rafael Goldchain’s new book, I Am My Family: Photographic Memories and Fictions (Amazon: US|CA|UK|DE), answers these questions by dressing up as his deceased relatives and taking black and white photographs that represent his scattered and forgotten family history. Martha Langford, an independent curator, introduces the book with an engaging essay that underscores Goldchain’s driving...

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Tauba Auerbach: 50/50

(Click to enlarge)Guest review by Andrew Shea. Tauba Auerbach manages to distill the content of her latest book, 50/50, into one brief summary: 100 Pages 100 Patterns, 50% Black 50% White. True to her word, there is no text in this book, the 100 pages to follow contain only black and white patterns. Auerbach is on a roll; 50/50 is her eighth publication since 2003 (each chronicling her progress as an artist), an impressive record for any 28-year-old visual artist. While Auerbach’s last...

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